Sunday, February 22, 2009

How Heu Mihi, the Haughty Dame of the Field, was taken ill with the same illness that had plagued her before, and of her anger thereat

Yesterday eve I was wonderly wroth to discover that the illness that had infected me before had once again opened within me, that its button was all to-brast and the soreness of the throat had returned. And I said, Thou false recreant student, whoever thou art, that hast to-give me of the illness yet again, I said, I shall find thee out and smite thee with mine sword, or if not mine sword, then with mine pen of bad grading. For though thou art perhaps a true student, I said, who meant not the harm that thou hast caused me, still thou hast had a sneezing on a paper, or it may be a coughing in the office upon the hours thereof, I said, and thou hast all forsickened me yet again, much to my weariness thereat, wherefore thou art a false recreant student and a traitor, and I would like to have thee all to-brent, but law forbids it. And thus I spent another weekend lying about feeling pitiful, and could not take my ease there at that time.

And so with great dolor out of measure I began to resort again unto mine cold medicine, and there was weeping, or if not weeping at least I fell down aswooning, for the cold medicine made me wonderly weary and I fell down as though dead and lay as a corse for many a long hour.

I'm teaching Malory these days, and I find the language working its way into my brain. Indulging its rhythms here is my solace in this time of sickness. You should try it sometime.

And fine, "Haughty Dame" is more of a Chretienism, but I couldn't resist.

9 comments:

What Now? said...

Hah! I'm so sorry to hear that you're sick, but I love this blog post!

At least be grateful that you haven't been reading Julian of Norwich, so you shouldn't have to worry about disturbing revelations.

heu mihi said...

--or really bad spelling, which is where Julian normally gets me. When "both" develops an "e" at the end and "shoe" somehow grows a "c," then I know I'm in trouble.

Fretful Porpentine said...

If I start doing this when I teach Malory next week, I will know whom to blame...

Belle said...

Thou art sick and ailing; hast thou slept? Partaken of sustenance and drink? Lo, may thine suffering cease with the stroke of that deadly pen! Fie on that dastardly student who hast infected the mighty Haughty Dame.

medieval woman said...

Ye Olde Ugh - I'm sorry thou art ille!

Good Enough Woman said...

I am sorry you are sore afflicted. I love the "traitor" bit. And with the weeping, I have images of Margery Kempe outside of a church (or inside one for that matter, or anywhere really). But that would be some serious weepage, which would certainly intensify your affliction.

squadratomagico said...

Mirthful!

Ortho said...

I hope you feel better soon.

My doctor suggested that I begin to wear gloves and a mask when I evaluate student work. She said this will prevent me from getting infected by their diseases, viruses, and bacteria.

Dame Eleanor Hull said...

I think I have to use this in teaching. Somehow. Why didn't you write this a year ago when I was teaching Malory??