Monday, February 16, 2009

Confessions of a medievalist

...
...
...I actually really enjoy teaching Brit Lit II.




Maybe even more than Brit Lit I.





It's the novels! The novels made me type it!



ETA: Really, both surveys are fun (I cannot malign my period!). But I could do without the 18th century. And some of the Early Modern stuff. Perhaps I'll feel less jaded if I teach Marlowe instead of Shakespeare next year...? And ooh! Judith! How fun would it be to teach Judith after Beowulf--totally, that is what I am going to do.

(Could I be suffering under the misapprehension that this semester is almost over...?)

9 comments:

Fretful Porpentine said...

I like teaching Brit Lit II, too, possibly because I like being able to spend hours looking up Pre-Raphaelite art and calling it class prep.

Sisyphus said...

Mwhahaha! We will convert you yet!

Or maybe only lord it over you. Or something.

Good Enough Woman said...

Do without 18th century? For shame! Perhaps you're overlooking the good stuff?

As for me, I just finished prepping for tomorrow's discussion on Chaucer--Pardoner's Tale and the Retraction. I could use a good medievalist for the day . . .

Thoroughly Educated said...

me too.

I used to teach an Beowulf-Virginia Woolf, all-in-one-semester course, and I lived for the week we got to Jane Austen.

teridr said...

You're definitely reading the wrong stuff in the 18th c. if you're not liking it. Add a nice Gothic novel to the mix, or maybe something light by Burney. Then, when you're hooked, you can start get back to Swift and Richardson and Smollett.

Good Enough Woman said...

And there's also Eliza Haywood . . .

heu mihi said...

Maybe I'll give Fielding a shot next year. I think that this year I actually pared the 18th c. down to just "The Rape of the Lock"; could that be my problem?

Dr. Crazy said...

Brit Lit II is wicked fun to teach.

That said, I sort of (seriously) wish that Brit Lit II went from the Restoration forward .... Oh, for the excuse to teach some stuff from the Spectator! Some Restoration plays! The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano Written by Himself!

Of course, if this were the case, I would probably pretty much skip the Victorian period. There's not enough time in the survey really to do justice to most Victorian novels, and dude, I hate Tennyson with a fiery passion. Which would really screw up my students' sense of the periods in ways that would ultimately be bad.

Also, if you're going to do Pope, I've had excellent luck doing Eloisa to Abelard in intro to lit, and I actually really love teaching it (though this may be in part because I pair it with Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind).

ink said...

Yay for novels! The last time I taught Development of the British Novel, it was a blast the whole way through...though the MASSIVE weekly reading prep kind of tempered the fun at times ("I have how many more hundreds of pages to go?").